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It’s easy to have your pet microchipped and it’s the responsible thing to do.

Having your pet fitted with a Tracer® Advance microchip means you have the best chance of being reunited with your pet if they go missing. Have complete peace of mind with a Tracer® Advance microchip.

Learn about microchipping Benefits of Tracer® Advance

Almost any animal can be microchipped

Microchipping Dogs

We all know that dogs love to run and explore, but unfortunately they sometimes lose their orientation or, if scared by something, may run off and get lost.

From April 2016, it will be compulsory for all dog owners in England to have their dog microchipped and ensure their dog’s details and owner contact information are registered on a reunification database. More information to follow soon….

Microchipping Cats

Cats love the sanctuary of a warm home but while outside exploring, some may get startled and run off or may roam too far and get lost trying to get back home. While microchipping cats is not going to be compulsory for now, it really is the best method to help you become reunited should they go missing. It’s really simple, and even a little kitten can be microchipped!

Equine Microchipping

Whether your horse is a pet or sports animal, they are highly valuable and the law states all equine animals must be microchipped.

Unfortunately, horses can be stolen and sold on - so any way of identifying a horse in suspicious circumstances is crucial.

Exotics Microchipping

There are a vast array of interesting and exotic animals including ferrets, parrots, turtles, tortoises, snakes, large lizards, dinosaurs (not really!) – Whatever pet you choose, you want to make sure they are safe and can be identified at all times. Please ask your vet about microchipping your exotic pet.

Compulsory Microchipping for dogs is here

To improve animal welfare and help reduce the number of lost and stray dogs, from 6th April 2016 it is now compulsory for all dogs in the UK to be microchipped and registered on a government compliant database.

The new legislation requires all puppies born after 6th April 2016 to be implanted and registered on a government compliant database in the breeder’s name by the time they are 8 weeks old (unless there is a medical reason why this cannot be done).

When the puppy is taken to its new home, the new keeper must transfer ownership into their own name.

Unchipped adult dogs must also be implanted with a microchip and details held on the relevant database must be up to date for all dogs.

Be prepared should the unexpected happen.

Having a microchip implanted by your Veterinary Surgeon is quick and simple and ensures that should the worst happen and your pet goes missing, you have the best chance of being reunited with them. You only need to have the microchip implanted once as it should last for the lifetime of your pet.

It is essential that when you have your pet microchipped that you make sure that the microchip number, your pet information and contact details are recorded and kept up-to-date on the Petlog database. Should your pet go missing, the person who finds them can call Petlog who can confirm that your pet belongs to you so they can be returned home safe and sound.

Pets can go missing for a variety of reasons (as listed below) and knowing you’ve improved your chances of being reunited is reassuring, during what can be a stressful time.

Moving House

Moving House

It’s very easy for your pet to become disorientated after moving to a new home or new area.

Apart from a microchip, you can take additional measures to help your pet adjust. For example, keep them inside initially so they become settled and used to new smells and sounds. Also, keep your dog on a lead and go for a walk to explore this new area.

Travelling abroad

Travelling abroad

Going on holiday and taking your pet somewhere different? Pets react in unusual ways if they feel uncomfortable, and after physically travelling they could also feel anxious and exhausted. They may not be used to unusual surroundings and can easily become disorientated - much like you could feel in new surroundings! If travelling abroad with your pet, they will need a pet passport or other paperwork. Please speak to your Vet for more information.

Unusual weather

Unusual weather

Thunderstorms and lightning can create fear and confusion with pets – outdoor cats particularly could get shocked, run away and get lost. It’s best to keep pets inside and letting them hide somewhere in the house is absolutely fine. Likewise, extremely hot weather can cause disorientation if a pet needs hydration. Always have fresh water available.

Fireworks season

Fireworks season

During fireworks season the reports of lost pets increase dramatically. Always remember to keep your pets inside if fireworks are going off. Adding to the loud bangs and whizzes, pet owners are often out enjoying the show and leave their pets alone. We advise one member of the family to stay at home, leave the TV on to help diffuse the noise, remain calm and try not to create any extra stress. It’s ok to let your pet hide in a safe place.

General loud or disruptive noises

General loud or disruptive noises

Building noise, parties at the neighbours, motorbikes and more… all of these everyday occurrences can affect our pets and just like us, they may try and escape to somewhere less noisy!

Out-of-the-ordinary atmosphere

Out-of-the-ordinary atmosphere

Hosting a party or family reunion is fun but can be very unsettling if your home is usually quiet and calm. New people and noises can affect your pets’ behaviour and in all the excitement, they could scoot out of an open door or window and get lost.

Illness

Illness

Some animals, especially dogs and cats, will attempt to seek privacy if they feel unwell. They may not bark, miaow or make a fuss but may search out a quiet spot on their own. If they have a microchip and someone finds them, they can be returned to you so you can look after them. Having a good comprehension of your pet’s state of health is really important in all stages of their life.

Have total peace of mind with a Tracer® Advance microchip

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How a microchip works

When you take your pet to your local Vet Practice, they will implant the microchip in the scruff of your pet’s neck, in a very quick and simple process, which feels very similar to having their annual vaccination. The microchip is very small, about the size of a piece of long grain rice, and only needs to be implanted once in your pet’s lifetime.

Once your pet has their microchip fitted, the unique microchip number, their details and your contact details will be registered on the Petlog database - your Vet Practice should do this for you and you can check the details are correct by contacting Petlog on 01296 336 579. You must keep these details up-to-date if you move or change your telephone number for example.

If your pet does go missing, you should notify all local Vet Practices and contact the Petlog database on 01296 336 579 and let them know so they can mark this on your record. If you have Petlog Premium, they can send out lost pet alerts for you. They can also advise you on the best ways you can find your pet such as who to call or putting up posters.

Whoever finds your pet can take them to the police, a dog warden, rescue centre or a vet practice who can scan them to check they have a microchip and obtain their unique microchip number. If the pet does not have a microchip it will be very hard to return them to their original owner, and they may even have to be rehomed.

Once the unique microchip number has been obtained, the Petlog database can be contacted who will match the unique microchip number to your contact information held on the Petlog database. They will know you are the owner and that you are looking for them.

Petlog will then contact you and let you know your pet has been found and arrangements can be made for them to be returned to you safe and sound.

Frequently
asked questions

How is it implanted?

When you take your pet to your local Vet Practice, they will implant the microchip in the scruff of your pet’s neck, in a very quick and simple process. The microchip is very small, about the size of a piece of long grain rice, and only needs to be implanted once in your pet’s lifetime.

How does it work?

The microchip holds a unique number and when it is scanned using a microchip scanner, the number can be obtained. This unique number, along with all your pet and contact information, is held on your record by the Petlog database so if your pet gets lost the number can be used to identify that the pet belongs to you for the purposes of reunification.

Does it hurt my pet?

When the microchip is implanted, it feels very similar to having to their annual vaccination.

What do I do if I move home or change my telephone number or email address?

You should visit the Petlog website www.petlog.org.uk to update your details. You will need your Pet's microchip number.

What do I need to do after my pet is microchipped?

The act of microchipping is quick and simple and nothing further needs to be done. Your pet will not need any special care so take your pet home and carry on as normal.

Your Vet Practice should record your unique microchip number, pet and contact information with the Petlog database, but it is your responsibility to keep those details up to date should your contact details change.

Is it a GPS?

No. A microchip does not emit a signal and cannot be used to track the location of your pet. The microchip holds a unique microchip number and when it is scanned using a microchip scanner, the number can be obtained. This unique number, along with all your pet and contact information, is held on your record by the Petlog database so if your pet gets lost the number can be used to identify that the pet belongs to you for the purposes of reunification.

Other questions…?

Please visit Petlog for other general microchip questions

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